Thursday, July 8, 2010

A sneak peek at stories in July 8th edition

Rev. Mr. Llane Briese, Thang Pham, Carlos Vargas, Thomas Zahuta, Michael Silloway and Mario Lopez, from left, prostrate themselves on the altar during a moment of prayer for the candidates. Photo by Michael Alexander. (More photos here.)

The Georgia Bulletin will be showing up in your mail box in the next couple of days.

Here's some of the stories you can look forward to reading:

Ordination of six new priests:
ATLANTA—Linda Koerner remembers when a young Llane Briese started coming to the youth group at St. John Neumann Church in Lilburn just a few years ago. From the very beginning, she recognized something special in the teen, so it came as no surprise when she heard he was discerning a vocation to the priesthood.
Koerner and her husband, Greg, came to the ordination Mass at the Cathedral of Christ the King on June 26, a celebration that welcomed six new priests into the Archdiocese of Atlanta. “It has been a privilege to watch him grow,” said Koerner as she waited for the Mass to begin. “Llane loves life … and embraces everything in the Catholic faith.”
Along with Rev. Mr. Briese, five other transitional deacons—Mario A. L√≥pez, Thang Minh Pham, Michael R. Silloway, Carlos E. Vargas and Thomas Zahuta—processed into the Cathedral on the warm Saturday morning to the delight of their teary-eyed families and friends. Smiles quickly appeared on the candidates’ faces as they processed in amidst camera flashes.
Sudanese Catholics celebrate with three bishops from their homeland

STONE MOUNTAIN—Sitting in colorful plastic seats in an indoor basketball court were members of the Lost Boys, the group of then youngsters who walked for hundreds of miles to escape war, minefields and violence that destroyed their Sudanese villages.
Now, the group is entering their 30s. They’ve landed jobs and made lives for themselves here. Among them were Diadi “Lino” Momo, 31, of Atlanta and Duang “Victor” Deng, 31, of Birmingham, Ala.
Despite the wars that drove them from family and into refugee camps and later into exile, they took it to heart when three visiting Catholic bishops from Sudan urged them and other former refugees to contribute to their homeland’s future.
The peril and promise of Sudan were at the forefront of the minds of the estimated 100 women, men and children, as they gathered on Sunday, June 26, in prayer with the bishops, at Corpus Christi Church.
“There is hope and there is fear,” said Momo, who now works in the shipping business.
Catholic artist Salvador Dali at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta
ATLANTA—What to make of Salvador Dali?
A painter. A sculptor. A photographer. A jeweler. Embraced by the public, but once dismissed by art critics.
The interpretation of the work of the late Spanish Catholic artist continues to evolve, much as his paintings challenged people to look at the world anew.
The High Museum of Art hosts a major exhibit, “Salvador Dali: The Late Work,” opening Aug. 7. It will feature more than 100 pieces of work done by the man after he split with the surrealist movement. The exhibit offers pieces rarely seen in the United States, including “Christ of St. John of the Cross,” which has not been on view here in 50 years.
See photos of the events and other features in the newspaper here and here.

Andrew, reporter

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